Environment

Hawaii Group Pulls Record Amount of Plastic From Ocean

Ocean Voyages Institute said it recently removed 103 tonnes of plastic from the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, double its best-ever haul.

09.07.2020 | by Christy Romer
Photo by Ocean Voyages Institute on Good News Network
Photo by Ocean Voyages Institute on Good News Network

Hawaii-based Ocean Voyages Institute (OVI) has this week doubled its own record for cleaning the notorious Great Pacific Garbage Patch, removing 103 tonnes of plastics and fishing nets.

As set out in a story on Good News Network (GNN), the haul is the result of a 48-day expedition, and the group will head straight back out to sea to collect more.

“I am so proud of our hard-working crew,” OVI founder Crowley is reported as saying. “We exceeded our goal of capturing more than 100 tons of toxic consumer plastics and derelict ‘ghost’ nets—and in these challenging times, we are continuing to help restore the health of our ocean, which influences our own health and the health of the planet.”

 

 

The team uses GPS satellite trackers to find tagged fishing nets, which invariably lead to other pieces of debris that have been pushed together by currents in the ocean. They are committed to ensuring that none of the recovered items end up in landfill: The waste is sorted and distributed to recycling companies, who use the debris for insulation or burn it to create energy.

The most recent voyage set out in early May, and the length of the most recent trip is dependent on funding raised. Crowley added to GNN that the aim is to have four boats working next year.

“We have vessels wanting to help clean up, so right now we can begin to make a big change, because our solutions are scalable,” she added, suggesting the company would also expand to other parts of the world in need of clean-ups.

The news follows the first true taste of success for Boyan Slat’s landmark ocean cleaning programme, The Ocean Cleanup Project.

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